World

UK weather: How to stay safe and look out for others in the heatwave

LYME REGIS, ENGLAND - JUNE 16: People enjoy the hot weather at the beach on June 16, 2022 in Lyme Regis, England. Hot air sourced from North Africa and flowing through Spain is bringing temperatures of up to 32C to the UK in the coming days. (Photo by Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images)

It’s expected to hit a muggy 34C today on so-called ‘Fiery Friday’ (Image: Getty Images)

It’s safe to say temperatures have risen this week – and today’s heatwave is set to get even hotter.

Britain yesterday recorded its second hottest straight day of the year and is expected to hit a muggy 34C today on what is known as ‘Fiery Friday’.

Steven Keates of the Met Office said: “There hasn’t been much exceptionally warm or hot days this year, but that will change.”

“We are expected to experience a brief heatwave late this coming week.”

South East England can see temperatures of 32C today, with Steven adding: “It could potentially be a bit hotter… Mid-thirties are possible.”

As a result, a heat health alert has been issued across much of the country.

Most of southern and central England is on a level 2 alert and northern England is on a level 1 alert.

The alarm acts as an early warning system, highlighting periods of high temperatures that can affect the health of the public.

WEYMOUTH, ENGLAND - JUNE 15: A couple looks out onto the beach on June 15, 2022 in Weymouth, England. Hot air sourced from North Africa and flowing through Spain is bringing temperatures of up to 32C to the UK in the coming days. (Photo by Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images)

A heat alert has been issued across much of the country (Image: Getty Images)

WEYMOUTH, ENGLAND - JUNE 15TH: A general view of Weymouth Beach on June 15th, 2022 in Weymouth, England. Hot air sourced from North Africa and flowing through Spain is bringing temperatures of up to 32C to the UK in the coming days. (Photo by Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images)

Make sure to stay hydrated and wear sunscreen during very hot periods (Image: Getty Images)

The government has also issued some advice on how to stay safe in hot weather.

According to the Council, during a hot spell in England and Wales in August 2003 there were more than 2,000 more deaths than would normally be expected.

And as the UK climate changes, hot spells are expected to become more frequent and intense.

Heat can hit anyone, of course, but some people are at greater risk of serious harm when it gets too hot — for example, babies, the elderly, the homeless, workers, people taking certain medications, and those with chronic illnesses.

To stay safe when it’s extremely hot, the government recommends staying out of the heat, cooling down, keeping your surroundings cool, or finding another cool place.

If you have family, friends or neighbors who are isolated, struggling to take care of themselves or at increased risk, check if they have the ability to keep cool during a heatwave.


What you can do to stay well during the heatwave

  • Drink enough liquid
  • Avoid excessive alcohol
  • Dress in light clothing according to the weather
  • Stay in the shade if possible
  • Keep your home cool by closing curtains and opening windows
  • Wear sunscreen and a hat to avoid sunburn
  • Slow down when it’s hot
  • Go inside or outside: whichever feels cooler
  • Remember that cars get hot and avoid closed spaces
  • Watch for signs of heat-related illness
  • Cool your skin with water
  • Stay safe while swimming by paying attention to warning signs
  • Call NHS 111 or 999 in an emergency

Get medical advice if you have a chronic medical condition or take multiple medications and find out if you need to store them differently.

Be aware that some medications can decrease your heat tolerance, but do not stop taking them unless directed by a doctor.

It was advised to pay attention to the news – should the heatwave affect transport, electricity and other facilities – and to keep an eye on the Met Office for weather changes and health warnings.

Plan ahead to avoid getting dangerously hot, for example stay out of the sun around noon at the hottest time of the day, bring water and sunscreen to avoid sunburn and stay indoors if possible shade if you must go out.


What to do in case of severe sunburn?

Sunburn is hot and sore skin caused by too much sun, according to the NHS. It may flake and peel off after a few days, but you can treat it yourself.

It usually gets better within 7 days.

When you get sunburned, your skin can:

  • feel hot
  • Feel sore or painful
  • A few days later flake or peel

If you have white skin, your skin is usually red or pink. If you have black or brown skin, you may not notice a change in your skin color.

If your sunburn is severe, your skin may also blister. Severe sunburn can lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke, which can include a very high temperature, dizziness, confusion, nausea, or muscle cramps.

If people have any of these symptoms, take them to a cool place immediately, give them plenty of water and call 911 for advice.

Get in touch with our news team by emailing us at webnews@metro.co.uk.

For more stories like this, Visit our news page.

https://metro.co.uk/2022/06/17/uk-weather-how-to-stay-safe-in-the-heatwave-and-look-out-for-others-16843516/ UK weather: How to stay safe and look out for others in the heatwave

Justin Scacco

InternetCloning is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@internetcloning.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button