Turtles are thriving in Cyprus thanks to British forces

EMBARGOED TO 0001 THURSDAY DECEMBER 29 Undated handout file photo issued by World Wildlife Fund UK (WWF) of a loggerhead turtle swimming in the open sea near Zakynthos, Lagana Bay, Greece. Turtle nests around British Forces bases in Cyprus are thriving thanks to conservation efforts by the Ministry of Defense (MoD) and civilian volunteers. The Ministry of Defense said that in 2022 a total of 172 green turtle and loggerhead turtle nests in the western and eastern Sovereign Base Areas (SBA) and in Akrotiri, Episkopi and Dhekelia, home of British forces supporting operations in the region, have been identified. Issue date: Thursday December 29, 2022. PA Photo. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Turtles. Photo credit should read: Michel Gunther/WWF/PA Wire

A loggerhead sea turtle swims in the open sea near Zakynthos in Lagana Bay (Credits: PA)

Turtle nests around British Forces bases in Cyprus are thriving thanks to conservation efforts by the Ministry of Defense (MoD) and civilian volunteers.

The Ministry of Defense said that in 2022 a total of 172 green turtle and loggerhead turtle nests in the western and eastern Sovereign Base Areas (SBA) and in Akrotiri, Episkopi and Dhekelia, home of British forces supporting operations in the region, have been identified.

Conservation work is carried out by volunteers made up of military and civilian personnel who oversee all nesting beaches.

In addition to reporting turtle tracks, they also report illegal and harmful activities, which may include overnight camping and lighting bonfires at late-night beach parties.

The Sovereign Base Areas Administration (SBAA) Environment Department is coordinating work to protect the turtles, working with volunteers and the SBA Police Department.

Alexia Perdiou, SBAA Environment Officer, said: “We are pleased to see the increasing number of turtle nests on the bases’ beaches in recent years, which is due to the important work we are doing together with our legion of military and civilian volunteers – Beaches patrol and search for turtle tracks in the early morning hours every day during the summer months.

Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Maui, Hawaii, USA

Turtles are threatened in different parts of the world (Source: Getty Images)

“We are careful not to interact directly with turtles or hatchlings and ensure nesting sites are protected from both human activity and invasive predators which combined with broader conservation efforts across Cyprus will ensure these incredible animals continue to flourish thrive.”

The SBAA is also supported by the Defense Infrastructure Organization (DIO), which provides stewardship funding for conservation work protecting breeding beaches to meet shared goals and legal obligations to protect designated sites and habitats.

The Environmental Advisor to DIO’s Cyprus Technical Service, David Reynolds, said he was “very pleased” with the increase in breeding success, adding: “This is the result of a unique and strong partnership spanning many years of hard work, and now we can really start to see the results of our work.’

MORE : Ultra-luxury submarine promises 360-degree underwater visibility and 18km/h top speed

MORE : Turtles and tortoises have figured out how to slow the aging process, study shows

https://metro.co.uk/2022/12/29/turtles-are-thriving-in-cyprus-thanks-to-the-british-armed-forces-18007022/ Turtles are thriving in Cyprus thanks to British forces

Justin Scacco

InternetCloning is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@internetcloning.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button