Skull puzzles do not extend to montage

One of the Christmas gifts Frans Boot received from Gregory Hills was “a desk calendar with daily puzzles. A “skull puzzle” every day, apparently sanctioned by Mensa. I stifled a giggle when I found printed instructions on the back of how to fold sections of the back cover to form the stand that holds the calendar upright.”

“Can I get in early for the 2023 semester?” asks Irene Wheatley of Blackheath. “I think it’s going to be ‘Show up for yourself.’ I’ve never heard or seen it before, but I’ve stumbled across it multiple times since day one of this year. It’s driving me crazy.” It’s on record for you now, Irene. Let’s see if it’s still a contender in November.

Russell Hill of Hobart wondered if “getting the ducks lined up and getting ready for bowling is either a good or a bad analogy”?

When Gillian Kendrigan from Canberra searched online for a jigsaw puzzle, she came across “a jigsaw puzzle entitled ‘The Tree of Life’ with a challenging design and 1000 pieces. Since it was only recommended for adults 98 and older, I wondered what drove that advice.”

Ashbury’s Peter Miniutti writes, “The same gremlin responsible for missing teaspoons (C8) and socks also visits my garage, where I often can’t find my tape measure or pencil.”

“Perhaps another source of missing teaspoons (C8) is aspiring musicians wanting to master the art of spooning?” surmises North Curl Curl’s Alan Marel. “When dessert spoons are missing, you look for heavy metal players.”

Toongabbie’s Bruce Moxon isn’t sure the theory holds, but “My novice wife and I postulated that teaspoons (C8) and clothespins run off together and turn into wire coat hangers. I’m not sure where socks belong, but we never hung them up anyway.” Teaspoons and clothespins parenting hangers? Is this a variation on the theory of coat hanger evolution from paperclips discussed on the adjacent pages of letters some 20 years ago?

With disappearing cutlery (C8), a feature of the CBD office where Cherrybrook’s Allan Gibson works, his numerous complaints resulted in someone going out and “bought two forks for my personal use. I keep them safe for the remainder of my tenure and after retirement the couple joined the household cutlery drawer. Now, 12 years later, they are a welcome reserve.”

Column8@smh.com.au

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Callan Tansill

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