Prosecco naming rights are part of migrants’ cultural heritage, Australia argues

“Whether it’s Prosecco, Parmigiano or Feta or any of those other products, they came here not because Australians went to Europe and took those products, but because Europeans came to Australia and started businesses and families and were part of Australians Story.”

In 2009, Italy changed the name of the Prosecco grape variety to Glera and added a town of the same name to the Prosecco region.

Through the free trade negotiations, Australia has petitioned the local industry to continue using the name of the Italian sparkling wine variety.

When completed, the Free Trade Agreement will be Australia’s most significant. Australia is hoping for better access to the $23 trillion European market for goods like beef, lamb, rice and sugar, while the bloc calls for the end of the luxury car tax and better protection for regional specialties.

Known as geographic indicators, these safeguards for regional specialties are a key part of recent rounds of negotiations, with agreement expected by mid-year.

Dal Zotto wants the government to push to keep the Prosecco name.

Dal Zotto wants the government to push to keep the Prosecco name.

Dal Zotto had his first sip of sparkling wine when he was four and there was always a bottle of Prosecco on the table at home. The decision to bring it to Australia was buoyed by the fact that he missed drinking a nice glass of it.

And on repeated visits to Valdobbiadene with some of his own wines, he said local producers had no problem at all with what he was doing – except when he ordered coffee instead of a Prosecco.

“When I first started growing Prosecco, it was never in my mind to do anything wrong or upset anyone,” he said. “There is room to grow good Prosecco for everyone.”

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https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/prosecco-is-protected-in-italy-but-for-otto-it-s-a-true-blue-australian-bubbly-20230118-p5cdfq.html?ref=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_source=rss_politics_federal Prosecco naming rights are part of migrants’ cultural heritage, Australia argues

Callan Tansill

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