Lifestyle

Parents’ biggest concerns about their babies’ development have been revealed

A BABY’S first words are precious – but most parents get stressed when they don’t say them soon enough.

A recent survey of 2,000 parents of children ages three and younger examined their concerns about their child’s development and found that 59% often worry that their babies are not reaching certain milestones, such as .

One study found that 59% of parents worry their babies aren't reaching certain milestones

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One study found that 59% of parents worry their babies aren’t reaching certain milestonesPhoto credit: SWNS
69% of parents worry that if their baby doesn't meet milestones on time, they will reflect negatively on them

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69% of parents worry that if their baby doesn’t meet milestones on time, they will reflect negatively on themPhoto credit: Getty

Parents are also concerned when their children stop walking, self-feeding or smiling after a certain age (29% each). And 69% worry that if their baby doesn’t reach milestones on time, they will reflect negatively on them as a parent.

Three-quarters of parents say they are confident they know when babies should reach their milestones (76%).

Still, 44% thought babies should start rolling between 0 and 3 months, while many don’t do so until they are at least 4 months old.

However, parents do research, wanting to know that babies should start smiling (25%) and some start teething (21%) before they are four months old.

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Respondents also know that by six months babies should be sitting (43%), drinking from a straw (31%) or sleeping on their own (28%).

They also made sure their baby was crawling (33%), walking (33%) or feeding themselves (27%) during the first year of life.

The survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of VTech, also found that 74% of parents try to stimulate their child’s development by introducing them to educational toys or games (54%) or feeding them enriching foods (51%).

Seven in 10 recognize the importance of play in helping young children reach their milestones (71%), and a similar percentage agree that physical activity is also crucial (73%).

Perhaps that’s why parents opted for “tummy time” with their baby, during which they lie on their stomach to strengthen their neck and shoulders (42%) and specifically look for toys that encourage movement (38%).

Imaginative games like drawing or building and verbally stimulating activities like singing or reading are also common ways parents try to support their child’s development (37% each).

While 63% believe interactive toys are important in the early stages of their baby’s life, the same percentage of parents admitted they sometimes get annoyed by these toys.

The most annoying parts vary from too many tracks (57%) or catchy tunes/sounds (55%). Yet almost all of these parents acknowledge that their concerns are beneficial to their child (94%).

“Parents know that developmental milestones are important, but don’t always know when or how to help their babies achieve them,” said Andy Keimach, president of VTech Electronics North America. “Baby toys are designed to engage children through play and discovery through multiple developmental stages, allowing parents to spend more time focusing on connecting with their baby through play.”

Most parents agree that today’s toys and activities are more effective at helping babies reach developmental milestones than they used to (72%). They also state that their child has already reached these milestones faster than expected (78%).

And 71% prefer toys that can adapt to grow with their child through multiple developmental stages.

“Whether it’s a multi-level product like the Kick & Score Playgym or a snack toy, baby toys are there for more than play,” said Keimach. “They’re a great option for parents who want to complement their playtime with their baby in an orderly manner to help them meet developmental milestones.”

72% of parents agree that today's toys are more effective in helping babies reach milestones than toys from the past

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72% of parents agree that today’s toys are more effective in helping babies reach milestones than toys from the pastPhoto credit: SWNS

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https://www.the-sun.com/lifestyle/5470400/parents-biggest-concerns-about-babies-development-revealed/ Parents’ biggest concerns about their babies’ development have been revealed

Jessica MacLeish

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