Earth has a new island thanks to an explosive underwater volcano

FILE - In this photo provided by New Zealand's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha???apai volcano erupts near Tonga in the South Pacific on January 14, 2015. The volcano shot millions of tons of water vapor high into the atmosphere, according to a study published in the journal Science on Thursday, September 22, 2022. Researchers estimate that the event increased the amount of water in the stratosphere — the second layer of the atmosphere, above where humans live and breathe — by about 5%. (AP Photo/New Zealand Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade)

The volcano sits on a seafloor ridge stretching from New Zealand to Tonga (Image: AP)

Although the earth is 4.543 billion years old, it is not done reinventing itself; this time by adding a whole new island.

On September 10, a dormant underwater volcano in the Southwest Pacific awoke and began seeping lava, according to Nasa’s Earth Observatory.

The volcano sits on a seafloor ridge stretching from New Zealand to Tonga and has the world’s highest density of underwater volcanoes.

Eleven hours after the eruption began, a new island rose above the water’s surface.

The Home Reef seamount volcano in the central Tonga Islands ejected plumes of steam and ash, discoloring the surrounding water.

FILE - This satellite image acquired by Japan's Himawari-8 weather satellite shows the eruption of the underwater volcano Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha???apai in the Pacific nation of Tonga on Saturday, January 15, 2022. The volcano shot millions of tons of water vapor high into the atmosphere , according to a study published in the journal Science on Thursday, September 22, 2022. Researchers estimate that the event increased the amount of water in the stratosphere — the second layer of the atmosphere, above where humans live and breathe — by about 5%. (Japan Meteorology Agency via AP)

By September 20, the island had grown to 24,000 square meters (Image: AP)

Landsat 9’s Operational Land Imager-2 (OLI-2) captured a natural color view of the young island on Sep 14.

According to Nasa, previous research indicates that the plumes of overheated, acidic seawater contain particulate matter, volcanic rock fragments and sulfur.

Researchers from the Tonga Geological Services estimated the island’s area at 4,000 square meters and its elevation at 10 meters (33 feet) above sea level on September 14.

By September 20, the island had grown to 24,000 square meters.

“The volcano poses a low risk to the aviation community and residents of Vava’u and Ha’apai,” the Tonga Geological Survey said in an update released Sept. 20.

‘However, all seafarers are advised to sail further than 4 kilometers from Home Reef until further notice.’

MORE: Supervolcano eruption fears after series of earthquakes in New Zealand

MORE : Magma flows from heart-shaped crater as Iceland volcano continues to erupt

https://metro.co.uk/2022/09/23/earth-has-a-new-island-thanks-to-an-explosive-underwater-volcano-17439871/ Earth has a new island thanks to an explosive underwater volcano

Justin Scacco

InternetCloning is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@internetcloning.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button