cultural resolutions that you actually want to keep

Every year people swear by a new diet, but what about our cultural consumption? We’re talking about a TV spree or devouring a pulp novel; We promise we’ll enjoy art that’s good for us, do a digital detox, or expand our taste buds. New Year’s resolutions are quickly forgotten, but at least they give us reason to reconsider our habits. Why shouldn’t we look at our aesthetic tastes with the same scrutiny? This year I will do my best to break away from my usual fare and try a whole new range of flavors. Here are 16 ideas to kickstart your cultural New Year.

From left: Working from “home” in the Great Hall of the NGV; Read an old favorite like Elizabeth Strout's My Name is Lucy Barton and toast Nosferatu at the Malthouse Theatre.

From left: Working from “home” in the Great Hall of the NGV; Read an old favorite like Elizabeth Strout’s My Name is Lucy Barton and toast Nosferatu at the Malthouse Theatre.

1. Let’s start with old pal Nosferatu, another cultured dude whose appetite is never satiated. Vampires are back in fashion – a new version of Stephen King Salem’s Lot Hits this year and director Robert Eggers (The lighthouse, The Northman) works alone Nosferatu. Closer to home, cinema’s first bloodsucker is about to take the stage. The Malthouse Theater has a killer selection of shows this year and Nosferatu (February 10-26) transplants the vampire to what is now Tasmania.

2. The sheer volume of new culture means we all struggle to keep up with what’s to see or read. It doesn’t leave much room for the special joys of reviving old favorites. This could be the year that changes, starting with Elizabeth Strouts Lucy Barton trilogyMax Porters lanny and anything and everything by Japanese film director Yasujiro Ozu.

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3. One of the lessons of lockdown has been that many of us have been able to get work done at home. Why not make the most of it and work in an inspiring place. Archive this report from the NGV’s Great Halldelete these emails in the Melbourne Museum Foyer, hesitate on the steps from ACMI.

4. Another side effect of the pandemic is the pent-up demand for amazing theater. MTC and Malthouse are full of promising new work. I watch a lot of independent performances, but the big players deserve a look right now. Start with MTCs primafacie (8 February to 25 March), Australian lawyer Suzie Miller’s show that took the West End by storm.

5. Opera isn’t my thing — the misogyny and racism that plague many of the classics, the often outrageous ticket prices and, you know, out of respect for my butt — but I know it leaves a gap in my cultural horizon. This year I will try to remedy it. Victorian Opera has the most encouraging cast, especially in The visitor’ (October 18-23) Exploring the impact of colonialism on indigenous peoples.

6. Some of the most interesting conversations I’ve had in recent years have been with Indigenous artists exploring the relationships between their contemporary practices and the diverse cultures in which they live. I’m looking forward to this year How I See It: Blak Art and Film at ACMI (until February 19). Partly because it brings together a group of artists I admire and partly because there are some I don’t know. I think there will be surprises and discoveries galore.

From left: Check out the Heide Museum of Modern Art; catch a stand-up gig with Claire Hooper Comedy Republic; Examining How I See It: Black Art and Film; and don't miss Prima Facie with Sheridan Harbridge at the MTC.

From left: Check out the Heide Museum of Modern Art; catch a stand-up gig with Claire Hooper Comedy Republic; Examining How I See It: Black Art and Film; and don’t miss Prima Facie with Sheridan Harbridge at the MTC.

7. Despite its central position in the history of Victorian fine arts, the Heide Museum of Modern Art is one of those places that seldom crosses my mind. The 2023 calendar offers plenty of reason to see each other again: the exhibition, quite, (until February 26) features artists from near and far – Anish Kapoor to Rosslynd Piggott – exploring how absences, holes and perforations can be sources of abundance and liberation.

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8th. Melbourne’s comedy scene is no longer dominated by the festival. There is a large year-round presence. Take advantage of it. Begin with Claire Hooper and the Good Company cast on January 5th at Comedy Republicthe venue on Bourke Street dedicated to live stand-ups year-round.

9. A strange side effect of the lockdown was that a large number of people reported a change in their reading habits. They read more but made less progress. I started reading short books, and where I was once a marathon reader, I became addicted to those short, intense sprints. The downside was that I lost my marathon legs. This year I’m going to wean myself off the short stuff. I’ll start with Vigdis Hjorths is mother dead . The last two works I read by the Norwegian writer were between 180 and 190 pages, but at 352 pages her new one shouldn’t make me sweat too much.

10 Another weird habit I’ve developed is watching a movie just so I can listen to a podcast synopsis. It’s almost like talking to close friends about a movie, but why would I want to overhear them discussing something I haven’t seen? The result is that I’ll look at something I’m pretty sure I won’t like and will insist on it even if I’m not into it. This is idiocy. Just listen to the podcast. To attempt Too creepy; Not seen, Still in progress or Pop culture happy hour without doing your homework first.

11. Movie and TV franchises can play on our emotions, and if I’m honest, the gravitational pull that some wield has nothing to do with the actual payoff. I do not torment anyone tasty, but I have more Marvel and forget war of stars movies as I remember. This could be the year that a higher profile subscription movie service is offered, e.g MUBI a go, or spend more time with canopya free streamer (if you have a library card) with a huge selection of outstanding world cinema.

From left: Take the kids to see the new MPavilion; Don't miss the dance company Chunky Move at FRAME Festival; and sneak in a morning movie at Yarraville's Sun Theater.

From left: Take the kids to see the new MPavilion; Don’t miss the dance company Chunky Move at FRAME Festival; and sneak in a morning movie at Yarraville’s Sun Theater.

12. Melbourne has long been home to some of the world’s most exciting contemporary dance, but nothing like it has ever happened before FRAME, a new biannual dance festival starting in March. It takes place in a dozen venues, involving large and small companies. There are the heavyweights like Chunky Move and Lucy Guerin Inc, but I’m also fascinated to see dance taking new forms through more unusual partners like the Center for Projection Art.

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13. My son was six months old when I took him to a show for the first time. It was a Spiegeltent diversion thing, and he totally embraced it. We’ve been to a lot of live performances since then, but somehow they’ve faded away in favor of other activities. It left a void I guess as sharing a room with strangers is a skill in itself. Best encourage early; I think I wish… at the Arts Center Melbourne (18-21 January), a collaboration between children’s theater specialists Patch Theater and circus loners Gravity and Other Myths.

14 And I should also introduce the children to interesting architecture. We could start with the newest pavilion Rate (until April 6th) the NGV, then take a walking tour of some of its past incarnations at Docklands, Melbourne Zoo and beyond.

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fifteen. The limiting effect of algorithmic recommendations earns less respect for the people who have taken it upon themselves to scour every cultural nook and cranny and report their findings. I want this year find these experts – whether professional critics or amateurs off the beaten track – to discover not what I was looking for, but the stuff I didn’t know I’d enjoy. I have time for current and former critics in the New Yorkerlike Anthony Lane and Emily Nussbaum, but with the collapse of Twitter, Tumblr is seeing a resurgence of people serious about promoting the weird things they love.

16 And finally, there is nothing like a suburban cinema at 10 a.m. on a weekday. Sample the art deco charm of Yarraville’s Sun Theater, which is devoid of the typical multiplex crowd. If you’re ever looking for a palate cleanser for your brain, you’ll find one there.

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https://www.smh.com.au/culture/theatre/20-23-visions-cultural-resolutions-you-ll-actually-want-to-keep-20221222-p5c87h.html?ref=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_source=rss_culture cultural resolutions that you actually want to keep

Jaclyn Diaz

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