After the horror at the hospital, we were forced to keep the remains of our dead baby in the fridge

ONLY in their fourth month of pregnancy did couple Laura Brody and Lawrence White know something was wrong.

Laura had been bleeding profusely, but at the doctor’s visit she was told everything was fine and they were sent on their way.

Lawrence and Laura knew something was wrong with their pregnancy but were initially told to go home and that

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Lawrence and Laura knew something was wrong with their pregnancy but were initially told to go home and that “everything was fine.”Photo credit: BBC
Unfortunately, the couple lost their baby after Laura miscarried at home. They are now trying to raise awareness so that the same does not happen to others

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Unfortunately, the couple lost their baby after Laura miscarried at home. They are now trying to raise awareness so that the same does not happen to othersPhoto credit: BBC

Doctors from Lewisham University Hospital assured them that their baby had a heart attack.

But just days later, another scan revealed that her baby had sadly died.

Miscarriages are common and it is estimated that about one in eight pregnancies ends in one.

There are guidelines for those affected to deal with the situation sensitively.

However, after finding out they had miscarried, the couple were sent home and told they had to wait for a bed so the distraught mother could give birth.

Just two days later, Laura woke up in severe pain and had to run to the bathroom.

There she gave birth to her baby boy.

Speaking to the BBC, Laura told how she screamed and ran from the room in a panic, urging her partner not to go to the bathroom.

What happened in the hours that followed was heartbreaking for the couple.

“I took a Tupperware box of my baby’s remains home in a cab from the hospital, made some room in our fridge, and put the box in there,” Lawrence said.

The Trust, which looks after the hospital, has now launched an investigation, but the couple have now relived their horrific experience to help others.

After Laura’s panic, they dialed 999 but were told the situation was not an emergency.

Then they had to pack their child’s remains in a box and travel to A&E.

Laura said when they got to the ER it was chaos.

“We were taken to the general waiting room and told to sit in the back.

“I was holding my baby in a Tupperware and crying with 20 or 30 other people in this waiting room,” she added.

After their wait, the couple were told Laura would need surgery to remove the placenta.

They claim the staff told them there was no safe place to keep their baby and that no one would open the box to take a look.

Lawrence said it was as if nobody wanted to acknowledge it, as if they did, “they had to deal with the issue”.

What is a miscarriage?

A miscarriage is the loss of a pregnancy in the first three months of pregnancy with a “late miscarriage”.

There are many reasons why a miscarriage can occur, but most are not caused by anything a mother has done.

Most of the time, a woman doesn’t find out why she miscarried, which can add to the ordeal.

In the first trimester of pregnancy, a miscarriage is usually the result of a problem with the unborn child.

The NHS says a common cause is abnormal chromosomes in the foetus.

If a baby does not have enough or too many chromosomes, a random event, it cannot grow or develop properly.

Genetics are to blame in about two to five percent of miscarriages when a partner has an abnormality in one of their chromosomes that they are unaware of.

There could be a problem with the development of the placenta, causing the baby to suffer from blood and nutrients.

In the second trimester, a weak cervix, an infection or STI, the shape of the mother’s uterus, and PCOS, and even food poisoning are all causes of miscarriage.

By that time, the couple had been in the hospital for five hours.

As midnight approached, they decided they had no choice but to bring their baby’s remains home.

Lawrence said he traveled home in a taxi, adding that having to make room in the fridge was a “surreal moment”.

Laura added that putting her baby in the fridge felt “grotesque”.

They are now speaking out in the hope that what happened to them will not happen to anyone else.

While praising staff and experts for their hard work, they said the miscarriage process was “flawed” and that they felt like they had been “tipped to hell.”

Laura said it felt like there was no “safety net” when it came to pregnancy issues.

In a statement, Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust said: “We are deeply sorry and offer our sincere condolences to Ms Brody and her partner for the tragic loss of their baby and these traumatic experiences.”

“A full investigation is underway to understand where care deficiencies may have occurred so that any necessary changes and improvements can be made.”

Laura and Lawrence said they felt like they'd been

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Laura and Lawrence said they felt like they’d been “tipped to hell.”Photo credit: BBC

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https://www.the-sun.com/health/5450411/keep-remains-dead-baby-fridge-hospital-horror/ After the horror at the hospital, we were forced to keep the remains of our dead baby in the fridge

Sarah Y. Kim

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